BLM Productions

presents

The Battle of Chantilly, (Ox Hill)

BLM Productions

 

During filming of Battle of Chantilly

Copyrights 2011, All Rights Reserved by BLM Production.

“The Battle of Chantilly (Ox Hill) is a compelling historical documentary. A must-see for anyone who lives in Fairfax County” - Lynne Garvey Wark, Chairperson, Fairfax County History Commission.

“This movie shows the violence of war and how it affected the men who fought at Chantilly (Ox Hill)” - Don Hackenson, “This Forgotten Land”.

 

Bert Morgan, of BLM Productions, and Charles Mauro, author of The Battle of Chantilly, are proud to announce a new Civil War video docudrama now available. Charles Mauro has written the screenplay and co-produced the project with Bert Morgan. The video program is created and mastered on digital video (DV). The project is entitled, "The Battle of Chantilly (Ox Hill)."


The battle, which occurred on September 1, 1862, was fought after the Battle of 2nd Manassas and before the Battle of Antietam. The conflict was the largest and most famous Civil War battle fought in Fairfax County, Virginia. Its location is near the present day intersection of Route 50 and West Ox Road.


Union forces referred to it as the Battle of Chantilly while the Confederates called it the Battle of Ox Hill. The main battle lasted two and one-half hours and resulted in 270 soldiers killed, 1,125 wounded, and 105 captured. Although the Union army was able to check the Confederate army during the Union Army's retreat towards Washington D.C. from Manassas, the Union Army lost two of their most valuable Generals during the short, bloody, and rain filled fight.


The movie was filmed at four locations, all within Fairfax County. The battle scenes were filmed at Frying Pan Park, which replicated the layout of the original battlefield. The day after the battle was filmed at the historic Civil War Blenheim Estate. The 1883 scenes were filmed at the historic Ratcliffe-Hanna house, post Civil War home of Confederate spy, Laura Ratcliffe. The 1915 monument dedication scenes were filmed at the actual battlefield itself.


Historical Entertainment (Gods and Generals) was used to cast this film. Actors from as far as California responded to the call. Jim Choate as General Issac Stevens, Russell Richards as Captain Hazard Stevens, Daryl Miles as General Philip Kearny, and Al Stone as General Robert E. Lee.